Paratroopers may be charged over massacre

LONDON: Northern Ireland’s Director of Public Prosecutions has confirmed he will examine whether the British paratroopers involved in the Bloody Sunday massacre can be prosecuted for murder, perjury or even perverting the course of justice.As the families of the victims joined civil rights campaigners in wild celebrations in Londonderry, Britain has split over whether the soldiers – many of them now septuagenarians – should face the courts 38 years after the deaths.The Saville report, running to 5000 pages and more than 30 million words of evidence, has been widely praised for its forensic, meticulous sifting of the mountains of evidence from thousands of marchers and witnesses present in Bogside on January 30, 1972.While the more than £190 million cost and the 12 years taken to compile the report has attracted criticism in the past, there is widespread relief both in Northern Ireland and Westminster that its rigorous approach may draw a line under the event, widely accepted to have dramatically escalated the violence that tore Northern Ireland apart in the 20 years that followed.Sir Alasdair Fraser, QC, the Director of Public Prosecutions in Northern Ireland, is now expected to carefully assess whether there is sufficient evidence for a ”reasonable prospect” of conviction for those paratroopers identified to have participated in the killings.Lord Gifford QC, who represented the family of one civil rights marcher, Jim Wray, who perished in a hail of gunfire, said that several charges could arise from the report which he described as ”thorough and even-handed”: ”Murder is, of course, the obvious one. But the report also found that soldiers deliberately attempted to mislead the inquiry.”The Prime Minister, David Cameron, who apologised for the massacre in the House of Commons when he unveiled the report, was careful to couch his criticism of the military in unequivocal language, paving the way for a DPP-led decision.”I never want to call into question the behaviour of our soldiers and our army, who I believe to be the finest in the world,” Mr Cameron said.”But the conclusions of this report are absolutely clear. There is no doubt, there is nothing equivocal, there are no ambiguities. What happened on Bloody Sunday was both unjustified and unjustifiable. It was wrong.”While the report has exonerated the army’s then commander of land forces in Northern Ireland, General Robert Ford, of blame, despite his decision to deploy the Parachute Regiment into the city against the advice of a senior police officer in Londonderry, it contained strong criticism of Lieutenant-Colonel Derek Wilford, the officer directly in charge of the paratroopers.The report found that General Ford ”neither knew nor had reason to know at any stage that his decision would or was likely to result in soldiers firing unjustifiably on that day” but Colonel Wilford had ignored orders that he should not order troops beyond a barrier deeper into the Bogside.What followed was ”not a justifiable response to a lethal attack by republican paramilitaries but instead soldiers opening fire unjustifiably”, the report concluded.Calls for the military to be prosecuted are already building from nationalists – but equally, these are starting to be echoed with demands for quid pro quo legal action against suspected IRA killers.For Mr Cameron and his new government, the conundrum may lie in finding an even-handed way to ensure that justice is not only done but seen to be done.The verdict The report concluded: The order to go into the Bogside should never have been given;None of the victims had a firearm;No warnings were given by the paratroopers – in breach of the soldiers’ terms of engagement;None of the shots was fired in response to attacks or threatened attacks;Some of those killed and injured were fleeing or going to assistance of the dying.
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Pocock says wake-up call arrived in good time

AS EXPECTED, the ever-combative, ever-direct Wallabies openside breakaway David Pocock has taken some positives out of being part of a scrummaging decimation against England at Subiaco last weekend.While some Australian forwards were slinking around after conceding two penalty tries, Pocock believed it was the ”wake-up call” they needed, after several seasons in which they had gradually started to believe they were a formidable pack.Admittedly the front-row stocks are well down at the moment, with Ben Alexander, Benn Robinson and Stephen Moore all sidelined, but Pocock yesterday argued this was still the time for everyone – young and old – to step up.”Without a good scrum you’re going to struggle to win the tight games,” Pocock said yesterday. ”We can’t rely on other aspects of the game to prop up one area which is lagging. It’s maybe not a bad thing that we got this wake-up call early, as we can now put a lot of work into that area.”Pocock can also comprehend why everyone was again focusing on the Australian scrum and its frailties.”After the weekend we realised how short we came. It is obviously an area where we have to improve a lot to be competitive,” Pocock said.”We know it is an area that could really hurt us and it did on the weekend. For the team and for the backs, we have to really get it right. We’ve spent a lot of time analysing it, talking about it, and then the training session yesterday was important.”It is always hard to tell when you’re up against the scrum machine [in training] because it doesn’t give you much back. But I know the guys will step up this weekend because we know that’s where they will come at us.”And he realises there will be no forgiveness from a ”hurting” England on Saturday night.”They will be a lot smarter. They will probably play to their strengths more and play the typical English game of field position, and using their big forwards to get the roll-on,” he said. ”If you give their backs a bit of space they are pretty dangerous. So as a forward pack we are expecting another big battle and we are under no illusions at scrum-time and lineouts where they are going to come at us.”He also expects England to be more expansive this time and not adopt the ”rope-a-dope” tactics they used in Perth. They bashed away to the extent that the rest of their game fell away dramatically.”It is very different to how it is played in the Super 14 to the Guinness Premiership and Heineken Cup. It is a different brand of rugby and I guess mostly due to the conditions,” he said. ”It is that clash of the different styles of play, but I’m sure England will adapt to the better conditions and use the ball a lot more.”
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Inglis, Folau have last laugh as Blues battered in five-star belting

BRILLIANT and brutal. And by the time a football match finally broke out of the boxing contest, Queensland had won a fifth consecutive series. Even Blues supporters could not argue that this wasn’t Origin at its best – even if NSW were close to their worst.——————————————–MATCH STATS: NSW v QUEENSLAND——————————————–There will no doubt be predictable scorn from some about the madness among the Queensland magic, and while politically incorrect thoughts dominated the lead-up to the encounter, this was exactly why rugby league can overcome the many and varied off-field issues.What happened on this rectangular field of grass is as good as it gets.You could say parts of last night’s victory by Queensland were predictable, but you could also argue no one expected anything like this. Greg Inglis and Israel Folau, such unfortunate parts of the incendiary build-up, scored the first tries of the contest and the latter finished with two. It would have been easy to predict the violence that dominated the first half, but not its bloodied intensity. It was 1980s violence and 2010 skills.And hopefully the size of the Maroons’ effort will not be forgotten when the blood has dried and the dust has settled from the racism scandal that had shadowed the contest.It was clear that the debate that had raged in the days before this game, claiming a number of victims – not least Timana Tahu and Andrew Johns – had also claimed NSW. While many wondered whether it would galvanise the Blues, it brought Queensland closer together. Add that to one of the best teams this code has produced and there would only be tears to match the Suncorp jeers.There will no doubt be further fallout. Coach Craig Bellamy will more than likely move on and several Blues players will surely be shelved in favour of youngsters to help build a team, rather than reconstruct one.It was an embarrassment in parts – the ultimate being that the Mexican wave began with 12 minutes remaining, when the match had been won and the Blues’ hopes had been sent not to the canvas but out of the ring.The Blues’ best chances of victory came in the many fights that broke out. The game’s officials had been slightly blessed last year that the fireworks that occurred did so towards the end of the contest. But the anger had been building from early on last night and by the 26th minute, when Luke O’Donnell upended Darius Boyd, all hell broke loose. O’Donnell ended the skirmish with his jersey ripped and he had clearly attempted a headbutt on Queensland forward David Taylor.The first scuffle came after just two minutes when the first penalty was awarded. Beau Scott and Inglis clashed repeatedly in the first 20 minutes; Michael Ennis hammered Darren Lockyer twice early.It was Paul Gallen, who doesn’t need an invitation to any on-field niggle, who hit Nate Myles high and then proceeded to tell the ref, ”I told you I was going to get him back”, pointing to the strapping around his forehead. Really, it has been brewing all week.The early efforts of Inglis and Folau had a ring of fate to them, too. Both had been the targets of racist comments by Johns. Inglis found himself over the try line after just three minutes, sent on his way by Johnathan Thurston.Then after just 12 minutes, Folau – the winger who may have played his final Origin – scored in the opposite corner. A remarkable opening for two of the key players.Until Brett White scored a late try, NSW had only come close when Cameron Smith kicked out on the full in consecutive sets. The margin should have been a record blow-out, but Lockyer’s inside pass to Billy Slater in the first half was wrongly ruled forward.QUEENSLAND 34 (I Folau 2 D Boyd C Cronk G Inglis W Tonga tries J Thurston 5 goals) bt NEW SOUTH WALES 6 (B White try M Ennis goal) at Suncorp Stadium. Referee: Tony Archer, Shayne Hayne. Crowd: 52,452.Game 1: QLD 28 bt NSW 24Game 2: QLD 34 bt NSW 6Series: QLD lead NSW 2-0
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Britain faces facts over Bloody Sunday

HOW do you measure the impact of words that were 38 years in coming? Some have tried to weigh them, noting that Lord Saville’s report on Bloody Sunday is a full 20 kilograms on the scales. Or that it contains 5000 pages in 10 volumes, the fruit of 30 million words of evidence.Others have tried to measure them in time, pointing out that it took 12 years for the law lord to reach his conclusions. Inevitably, others reach for a financial scale, gulping at the more than £190 million ($326 million) price tag.But a better measure might be the human one, starting with the cost not of the inquiry but of the episode itself. The cold facts of January 30, 1972, are so well known that for a while they lost their power to shock. Thirteen civil rights marchers were shot dead on the streets of Londonderry by the British Army; another died later of his injuries.But when you hear again the lasting, human legacy of those facts, the numbness fades. Not the larger consequences – including the view, expressed to me by a veteran republican, that Bloody Sunday all but created the Provisional IRA, as well as fixing Northern Ireland on a path to mayhem and violence that would endure for decades – but the more intimate impact.The death of 17-year-old Michael Kelly, a trainee sewing machine mechanic, becomes more real when you read that his mother was so broken that her family feared letting her out of the house. One day they found her heading up towards the cemetery, clutching a blanket. “I’m going to place it over Michael’s grave to keep him warm,” she said.For the Kelly family, and all those like them, every penny spent by Saville has been worth it. You could see that, written on their faces as they gathered in the sunshine of the Guildhall Square in Derry on Tuesday, fresh from getting their first glimpse of the Saville report, fist-pumping the air and declaring, one after another, in a desperately moving ceremony, that those they had loved and lost had been found innocent.Inevitably, there are complaints that, since 3700 people lost their lives in Northern Ireland’s Troubles, it is unjust that 14 victims have been elevated to a higher rung in the hierarchy of suffering, their murders scrutinised by a full legal inquiry denied to the others. The only answer to that lies in the nature of the killers. For those pulling the trigger were British soldiers acting in the name of the British state, mowing down their fellow citizens. This is what gives Bloody Sunday its singular quality: it represents the biggest single massacre by the British military on British territory since Peterloo in 1819.If the event itself was one of historic proportions, so is the report. It represents a rare admission by the state that it committed a grave wrong. By conceding that the killings were “unjustified and unjustifiable”, and adding that he was “deeply sorry” for them, David Cameron has told the world that Britain killed innocents and, through the whitewash of the 1972 Widgery report, covered up that truth. The Saville findings and Cameron’s statement will take their place alongside Tony Blair’s apology for British culpability in the Irish potato famine of the 19th century: mocked by some, but a step towards a true reckoning with its imperial past.Will it be enough?In one immediate way, it will. What always united the Bloody Sunday families was the urge to see the names of their loved ones cleared. The accusation in the immediate aftermath of the massacre that those killed had been armed terrorists represented a kind of double death. Not only had these men, half of them teenagers, been gunned down, they had also had their reputations destroyed. Saville’s declaration that none of them posed any kind of threat delivered the exoneration that these families craved. For most it came too late: all but one of the parents whose sons were killed that day are now themselves dead.Where the families divide is on the question of what should happen next: should the paratroopers held by Saville to have been out of control, and to have lied about their actions afterwards, be prosecuted, either in a criminal case or a private, civil action? Some say they won’t rest until they see the killers in the dock; others believe they have now had their judgment day, thanks to Lord Saville.The arguments for prosecution are powerful. Murder is murder, no matter who commits the crime. No one is above the law. And, it should be stressed, Saville gave no blanket promise of immunity to the soldiers who came before him.Guardian News & Media
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Give away riches urges Buffett

Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates and billionaire investor Warren Buffett are launching a campaign to get other American billionaires to give at least half their wealth to charity.Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., said in a letter introducing the concept that he couldn’t be happier with his decision in 2006 to give 99 per cent of his roughly $US46 billion ($A53.3 billion) fortune to charity.Patty Stonesifer, former CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, said on Wednesday that Gates and Buffett have been campaigning for the past year to get others to donate the bulk of their wealth.The friends and philanthropic colleagues are asking people to pledge to donate either during their lifetime or at the time of their death. They estimate their efforts could generate $US600 billion ($A695.17 billion) dollars in charitable giving.In 2009, American philanthropies received a total of about $US300 billion ($A347.58 billion) in donations, according to The Chronicle of Philanthropy.The handful of billionaires approached so far have embraced the campaign, said Stonesifer, a close friend of Gates who offered to speak about the effort.Four wealthy couples have already announced their pledges, including Los Angeles philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad, Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest of Philadelphia, John and Ann Doerr of Menlo Park, California, and John and Tasha Mortgridge of San Jose, California.In addition to making a donation commitment, Gates and Buffett are asking billionaires to pledge to give wisely and learn from their peers.They said they were inspired by the philanthropic efforts of not just other billionaires but of the people of all financial means and backgrounds who have given generously to make the world a better place.Their philosophical forebears are the Carnegie and Rockefeller families, who donated most of their wealth back to improve society and were the grandparents of modern philanthropy, said Stacy Palmer, editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy.Ted Turner’s announcement 13 years ago of a $US1 billion ($A1.16 billion) gift to United Nations programs also was done in part to inspire other big givers, but did not have a noticeable result, Palmer said.”It’s a stretch to see how they’re going to get to the $US600 billion ($A695.17 billion) figure,” she said, noting that only 17 people on the Forbes list of the 400 wealthiest people in America are also on the Chronicle’s list of the most generous American donors.Many of these people may be giving anonymously or plan to donate when they die, but the bulk of money raised by charities today comes from non-billionaires giving $US5, $US10 or $US50 at a time, Palmer said.Buffett’s plan will eventually split most of his shares of his Omaha, Nebraska, company between five charitable foundations, with the largest chunk going to the Gates Foundation.He also plans to give Class B Berkshire shares to the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation, which he and his late first wife started, and to the three foundations run by his three children.Buffett said in 2006 that his other 73,332 Class A shares of Berkshire stock, worth about $US8 billion ($A9.27 billion), would also go to philanthropy, but he didn’t specify how those shares would be distributed.Bill and Melinda Gates have made a similar pledge through the establishment of their Seattle-based foundation.Gates and Buffett are asking each individual or couple who make a pledge to do so publicly, with a letter explaining their decision.”The pledge is a moral commitment to give, not a legal contract. It does not involve pooling money or supporting a particular set of causes or organisations,” they explain in a written statement about the project.AP
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Australian troops in fierce combat with insurgents

SPECIAL forces troops had ”ripped the heart out” of a powerful insurgent group in a battle in southern Afghanistan, the commander of Australian forces in the Middle East said.The battle occurred during a five-day operation in Kandahar province, where Australian commandos and Special Air Service soldiers are taking part in what the NATO-led coalition hopes will be a decisive push against insurgent strongholds over the next few weeks.Major-General John Cantwell said the Australian troops and their Afghan counterparts had routed a group of well-trained and well-armed fighters, many of whom are believed to have trained in Pakistan.Defence will not comment on how many Australians were involved in the battle, or on how many insurgents were killed, but an Australian soldier was shot in the arm and an Afghan soldier was shot in the side.”These are definitely the bad lands, it’s an insurgent haven, it’s very tough terrain, it’s very hard to get in there and any time we send our forces in there, we know we’re in for a fight, and that’s certainly what we got on this occasion,” Major-General Cantwell told the Herald.”It stands out as one of the most significant military actions our blokes have been involved in for many years.”Major-General Cantwell said the area was important because it was close to Kandahar, an insurgent haven, and it controlled approaches to Oruzgan province, where most of Australia’s 1500 troops are stationed.Australian commandos who first arrived in the area, Shah Wali Kot, were greeted by heavy resistance, Major-General Cantwell said. The Afghan-Australian forces then learned more insurgents were massing to attack the commandos, and the SAS troops were sent in by helicopter to attack.”They were straight into the thick of a very intense gunfight as they were getting off the helicopters, and some of the helicopters sustained damage in the process,” Major-General Cantwell said.”I cannot tell you how extraordinary the feats of combat skill and courage were on display by our special forces guys from the minute they were off those helicopters. Straight into the teeth of the fight, under heavy machine-gun fire, heavy [rocket-propelled grenade] fire and heavy small arms fire.”Major-General Cantwell said the Australian troops decided not to call in an air bombardment because they were not sure if civilians were present. Instead they fought the insurgents house to house.It is believed that some of the fighters killed had been trained in Pakistan, where senior Taliban leaders fled after the coalition overthrew their government nearly a decade ago.While the Defence Minister, John Faulkner, and the Defence Force Chief, Angus Houston, have been reluctant to disclose exactly what role the Australian troops are playing in the Kandahar offensive, they have said consistently that special forces will be involved in ”shaping operations” – defined by Air Chief Marshal Houston as disrupting Taliban sanctuaries.The action last week came days after a roadside bomb in Oruzgan killed Sappers Darren Smith and Jacob Moerland, and Sapper Smith’s sniffer dog.Sapper Moerland’s funeral will be held in the town of Gayndah, in Queensland, today.
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China rides to the rescue of debt-burdened Greece

ATHENS: Greece’s debt-ridden economy has received unexpected endorsement from China as the two countries announced multibillion-dollar accords to boost co-operation in fields as diverse as shipping, tourism and telecommunications.The deals, under which Greek olive oil will be exported to China, were a welcome relief for a government smarting over the credit ratings agency Moody’s move hours earlier to downgrade the nation’s credit rating to junk.While signing the agreements, a Chinese vice-premier, Zhang Dejiang, not only praised Greece’s efforts to resolve its worst debt crisis in years but gave the euro zone’s weakest link a public vote of confidence, declaring it would soon come out of the woods.”I am convinced that Greece can overcome its current economic difficulties,” Mr Zhang said after arriving in Athens with 30 of China’s leading businessmen. ”The Chinese government will encourage Chinese businesses to come to Greece to seek investment opportunities.”Greek officials said the 14 deals amounted to the biggest single investment by China in Europe.China sees Greece as a ”perfect gateway” to the continent and Balkan peninsula, where Chinese exports have proliferated in recent years.Under the agreement, Cosco, one of the world’s largest container terminal operators, will extend its reach with the construction of up to 15 dry bulk carriers in Greece.The company took over cargo management at Piraeus, Greece’s premier dockyard, on a 35-year concession worth $US1 billion last year. The Chinese company BCEGI also signed an accord, thought to be worth about $US143 million, to develop a hotel and shopping mall complex in Piraeus.Other deals include the exchange of know-how between Huawei Technologies of China and the Greek telecoms organisation OTE, and four agreements signed by food firms to export olive oil to China.The Chinese are considering buying a stake in the loss-making railway network OSE, which the socialist government has pledged to privatise, as well as building an airport on the island of Crete, a logistics centre north of Athens, and a marine theme park, Greek officials say.China’s experience in Greece has not always been easy. Cosco’s bid to take over the administration of wharf services in Piraeus was initially met with fierce opposition from trade unions.Guardian News & Media
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Revolving door costs taxpayers millions

THREE premiers, a constant reshuffle of ministers and a change of opposition leader have cost NSW taxpayers $5.9 million in staff severance payments, says the Auditor-General, Peter Achterstraat.In a scathing report, Mr Achterstraat said on average one in three government staff left their job each year, and 60 per cent of them received generous termination payments.An audit found 147 media and policy advisers, assistants and chiefs of staff had been terminated from July 2006 to December 2009, with an average payout of $40,200. Another 110 resigned.Although the redundancy packages were generally larger than those for staff in other states and the Commonwealth, all but two were within the government’s guidelines for ”special temporary employees”.Mr Achterstraat was highly critical of the payouts to two senior advisers who left with a combined total of $235,000 – $177,800 more than under the guidelines.One employee, understood to be Graeme Wedderburn, a former chief of staff to former premier Nathan Rees, was terminated after working 10 months but received $139,000 rather than the standard $35,500. Mr Wedderburn’s contract stipulated that he would be paid half of his annual salary if he was dumped.The second, who worked for seven months, received $96,000, $74,300 more than the guidelines.Mr Achterstraat said the Department of Premier and Cabinet should follow its own rules when spending taxpayer dollars. “The rules are clear on severance pay. There should be no special deals,” he said.”The severance pay guidelines are a bit like the salary cap and like a salary cap they work best if everybody knows the rules and everyone sticks to them.”The report found most terminations followed the 2007 election – despite there being no change of government – the resignation of Morris Iemma in 2008 and the rolling of Nathan Rees last year.The director-general of the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Brendan O’Reilly, rejected the recommendation that severance should be paid only according to the guidelines, saying he intended to keep his right to make exemptions ”when appropriate”.Yesterday Ms Keneally said there were now no staff on a special deal. ”Nobody in my government has those sorts of arrangements,” she said.
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Canley Vale and the great missing elevator: billed but not built

A SYDNEY primary school was billed $196,144 for a lift that was never built under the federal government’s $16.2 billion school building program.The item appears in the costings for the Building the Education Revolution project at Canley Vale Public, one of the few schools that managed to obtain a full costing of their project.The project’s managing contractor, Hansen Yuncken, confirmed the error in an email dated June 7 to the school’s principal, Cheryl McBride.Ms McBride also met representatives from the company and is concerned that her school has missed out on $196,144 as part of its $3 million allocation from the Commonwealth for classrooms and refurbishments.”I want copies of the receipts to demonstrate that the funding has or hasn’t been spent on the school and if it hasn’t we want that funding back to spend on other projects,” she said.”I am seriously worried about what is going on and the children at Canley Vale Public School deserve to have that funding spent on them as originally intended. There are many other playground and building issues on which we could spend that money at the school.”Ms McBride, who also chairs the Public School Principals’ Forum, said she found the error after a long battle to obtain the records for the building projects.”The financial papers and communication has been incredibly opaque and misleading. How many more of these are across NSW?”Under costings, Hansen Yuncken will be paid $39,421 for project management, $90,105 for site management and an incentive fee of $28,158 for the project.The BER whistleblower Craig Mayne, who has worked as a civil engineering design draughtsman, said the school had also been charged $79,885 for earthworks. ”If you allow $135 per hour for an excavator and $5000 for removal of soil, they would have had to have the excavator on site for 555 hours or 13 weeks.”A spokesman for the Department of Education and Training said any documentation that included a lift ”is an error”.
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Plane flying on one failing engine, witness says

ONE engine had stopped and the other was not operating at full power moments before a plane crashed into a Canley Vale street, killing its two occupants, an expert witness said.As investigations continued yesterday into what went wrong, a pilot with 33 years’ experience told the Herald the plane flew over him 2½⁄ minutes before it crashed.He said the aircraft was ”only 250 to 300 feet” (about 75 to 90 metres) above him at Fairfield Golf Course and he could clearly tell the right engine of the twin-engine Piper PA-31 Mojave had stopped working and the left was not operating at full capacity.The aircraft’s pilot, Andrew Wilson, reported he could not maintain height just before crashing next to Canley Vale Public School on Tuesday.”There was either a fuel problem or an electrical problem,” the pilot, who asked not to be named, said.Given the plane’s altitude when he saw it, he said Mr Wilson, 28, had no chance of making it to Bankstown Airport after turning around at Richmond.”At least if you’re up high you’ve got the chance for a pretty good glide. But even with one engine gone you’ve got a lot of distance to reach,” the pilot said. It was revealed yesterday that neither Mr Wilson or his co-passenger, in-flight nurse Kathy Sheppard, were originally supposed to be on board the plane bound for Brisbane to pick up a patient that day.A fellow pilot and friend, Mark Muscat, said Mr Wilson had not initially been rostered to work that day and the pair had arranged to meet up. Mr Wilson was also about to leave his job with Airtex Aviation and start work with an airline.Mr Wilson’s mother said that had been her son’s dream.”He’s a wonderful son … I couldn’t fault him in any way. He worked hard to achieve his goals. He always wanted to fly,” Anne Baker told Channel Seven.Ms Sheppard, who phoned her partner when the plane began encountering trouble, had swapped with another nurse only 30 minutes before take off.Her father, Noel Martin, said last night that Mr Wilson had done all he could to land the plane with his daughter, a mother of four, on board.Ms Sheppard’s daughter, Erin, yesterday posted on Facebook that she had received her pilot licence in the mail on Tuesday – the same day as the crash – but never got to ”show it off to Mum”.with Megan Levy
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